What Do the Neighbors Think?

So, this week has been a very eventful week adding to the never-ending story of my “AG”ventures. While I was driving home last night thinking about this past week’s events, a sudden thought hit me. “I wonder what my neighbors think of some of the things we do on our farm?” All of the events that I am getting ready to tell you about occurred where my neighbors could easily see me. You see, a few years ago when we sold all of our dairy cows, we sold some land to a developer. Now, land that our Brown Swiss and Holstein cattle grazed on and our green tractors mowed is now providing people with homes. (That’s a fancy way of saying it is now a subdivision.) Even though we don’t milk anymore, we still have a few cows left and have horses. Technically we are not an actual full-functioning farm, but our neighbors tend to think otherwise. So, this leads me to my original question. “I wonder what my neighbors think?” As I get ready to write this, I just want to let you know that it is okay to laugh. I really won’t be offended. 😛

I had to do an equine demonstration for a local 4-H club, so my mom (who’s birthday is today…Happy Birthday!)  and I loaded up our horses and headed to the saddle club. We’ve got an old Brown Swiss cow that we could not sell last year because of her bad legs. She was due to calve that day and appeared she could pop at any time, but showed no signs of calving before we left. We were only gone 3 hours and guess what?  As my mom was parking our trailer and unloading horses, I went to check on her and seen her behind the barn (which is in plain sight of every single one of our neighbors) obviously in labor.

"Kokomo" is now doing great!

From a distance, I couldn’t tell if everything was normal. Like luck always runs, the calf was coming backwards which is a major, major uh-oh. My mom went and grabbed two baling strings and tied it to the calf’s legs. (The cow had gotten up at this point so you can only imagine what the scene looked like.) We began to pull, my mom pulling the strings and I had a hold of the calf’s legs. We were able to deliver the calf, and it was barely alive. We sprang into action. I was on my hands and knees by the calf’s face trying to clear the fluids out of her nose and mouth. My mom was doing whatever she could to help the calf breathe. It was apparent that we would need to lift the calf from its back legs to let gravity pull the fluids from her mouth, nose and lungs. Mind you, this calf is pretty good size. I’m 6′ foot and pretty stout (and somewhat injured from getting bucked off a horse earlier that week. Different story for another time) My mom is only about 5’7″ but for those of you who know her, she is a strong lady! We were able to lift the calf from her back legs to allow fluid to drain. She than began breathing normally, and we knew she was going to be all right. My mom and I at this point were completely tuckered out. Not only did we pull the calf by ourselves, we also were able to hold her in the air from her back legs. Yeah, you can call us awesome. (I just viewed it as good mother-daughter bonding time!)

It took me a few days to realize that some of our neighbors may have seen that entire event unfold. Two women pulling a calf, shoving their hands in its mouth, sticking their fingers in its nose, hanging it from its hind legs. Are they crazy?!?! I could only imagine what the scene would look like to those who are unfamiliar with delivering calves. This was definitely an extreme calving case; however that still doesn’t mask the fact that our neighbors still could have saw it. Lucky for us, the sheriff wasn’t called or PETA wasn’t notified. Hopefully our neighbors understood that we were only doing the best for the cow and calf.

On a more serious note, the morale of this story is this. A lot of times, people see us farmers do things that they think are absolutely cruel and inhumane. It is up to us to educate them about why we do the things we do. You never know who is watching. It all boils down to this main fact. It is up to us farmers to educate the public about agriuclture and farming!

In case you were wondering, the calf, now named “Kokomo” and her momma are doing great. They are alive because we helped them. We cared, just like farmers do.

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Comments

  1. I love this post!! It is exactly what we as the agriculture industry need to be doing to spread the positive message of agriculture. How can we expect others to understand what we do when we don’t stop to explain it to them. We have to remember they haven’t been around agriculture all their lives, and thus don’t realize everything we do is for the purpose of protecting our animals and environment.

  2. ha ha ha I know what you are talking about i have done things like this and asked my self this same question

  3. Thanks! And I completely agree. It is up to US to spread the word and protect/preserve our industry!
    🙂

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